New Workout Playlist: Paragraph 14

Paragraph 14

I hate exercising. I’ve made no secret of that all these years. Steve is an exercise-induced dopamine junkie. (I’m glad he is and wish I were.)

When I finish working out, he will typically ask, “Did you have a good workout?”

What does that even mean??!!

Workout Crime Scene

I didn’t die. The workout didn’t kill me; so, does that make my workout a “good workout?”

There is only one thing good about working out: getting to listen to music using my Ultimate Ears in-ear monitors. God they make the music sound fantastic!

So, I was getting tired of my previous workout playlist, which I blogged about in this previous post. Yesterday I hopped on to Spotify to create a new workout playlist. I decided to give it a unique name for a workout: Paragraph 14. It’s description is Paragraph 14 borrows some energy from the cosmos to help me get through a workout session. And that about sums it up.

If you haven’t noticed, I need phat1 , bulbously phat and boisterous base lines in my workout. Otherwise, I just curl up and die–as did Mr. Smiley face pictured above. Paragraph 14 provides those bulbous base lines. Additionally, I wanted music I had never heard before. Paragraph 14 is almost completely fresh stuff with one exception: Primadonna by Skogsrå. Nothing in the paragraph is nearing its expiration date.

Here is my newest workout playlist on Spotify.


To help me endure an hour on the elliptical, I’ve decided I need to reframe my thinking about working out. Once upon a time, when I was but a budding youthlette, I would try to hit the dance floors on the weekends. My favorite dance partner was Mary J. Girl can dance! She used to say, “White boy doesn’t even move from the waistline down. How do you even do that?!” She was right! I’m a terrible dancer but loved it none-the-less.

So, I’m now trying to think of working out every day as going dancing on the elliptical. I’m returning to my youth–if only! Ouch. Where’s the ibuprofen?! I can barely move now.


  1. I use this word in a completely non-sexual way. Apparently it was sometimes used to suggest sexual overtones in some subgroups. I mean it in an auditory sense: sumptuous, fat. It perfectly describes the bass lines in almost all of the pieces included in Paragraph 14.