8mm Horseshoe Cove Point Pole Pano Play Button

New 360º Panoramas of Horseshoe Cove

These are my first two experiments with a different way of making 360º panos with the camera lens way up high on a tall pole.

With the wind (extreme wind yesterday when I shot these), this becomes a huge challenge! Precision is the name of the game with panos, and a wobbly tall pole makes shooting anything but precise. Add to this the fact that the camera atop the pole becomes incredibly top heavy (probably by some exponential factor engineers would immediately be able to articulate). Pole management is therefore a bit of effort (so as not to lose your expensive camera/lens out in the bay!).

Then, you have the whole issue of how on earth are you going to fire the camera when it’s atop a 20′ pole?! Solution: the very new CamRanger, the coolest device on the planet! CamRanger attaches to the camera via USB, takes control over the camera, and creates a WiFi network. The iPhone or iPad then connects to the WiFi network. The CamRanger iOS app on your iPhone/iPad shows you the live image through the camera viewfinder and (drumroll) has live control of the camera! Yes, you can focus and adjust settings all in real time, even transfer your photos from the camera to your iOS device over the WiFi network CamRanger creates. It’s just sheer awesomeness!

CamRanger: Tim really, really likes!

Anyway, I like the new perspective from “up in the air.”

For my future reference

The top pano was shot every 60º horizontally using the Atome, a gift from Matthew Rogers @360precision years ago when I bought my 360 Adjuste he designed. Thanks, Matthew! This is the first time I’ve used the Atome, and I love it! Works great on a pole. Six shots around actually seemed adequate for removing the few people (and dog) who were milling about.

My shadow shadow was eliminated by shooting the two shots when the camera was mostly facing the direction of the shadow while standing on opposite sides of the pole with arm as extended as I dared while maintaining control of the pole in the wind. So, in this case, for the 120º shot I was standing to the right of the pole’s shadow, and in the 180º I was standing to the left of the pole’s shadow.

Three nadir shots (for good measure) were all shot with the 90º nadir adapter. I moved the tripod about a foot so the lens was over where the center of the tripod had been. I stood next to the pole, and then to either side (left/right) of the pole shadow. I even moved the tripod again for the 3rd nadir shot. I’m not sure if the nadir strategy or the horizontal shot strategy proved more effective in removing shadows. Maybe both?

The tripod legs were on the second tier for extra support. The top level of the pole was not extended because of the extreme wind.

8mm Horseshoe Cove Point Pole Pano Play Button

 

The bottom pano was shot every 30º horizontally using the Atome. (This was way more than adequate for removing the people who were milling about.) I tried a different approach to eliminate my shadow by shooting the same same shot (when the camera was mostly facing the direction of the pole shadow) twice: while standing on opposite sides of the pole with arm extended. The wind was less extreme here. So, in this case, for the two 120º shots I was standing to the right of the shadow and then to the left of the shadow.

Two nadir shots (again for good measure) were shot with the 90º nadir adapter hanging the lens over the point where the center of the tripod had been: standing on either side to the pole based on the location of the pole’s shadow. This method seemed less successful in removing the pole shadow, requiring more work. (So, maybe the 3 nadir shots in 2 different positions were the trick?)

The tripod legs were on the first tier. The entire pole extension was used, and, interestingly, the pano appears noticeably higher. (Maybe it just seems higher because of the stairs marking an increase in ground level?)

 

8mm Horseshoe Cove Point Pole Pano Play Button